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    2. Keep It Simple

      I’ve played competitive golf since I was 14 years old. Over the years, I was fortunate to compete against some of the best golfers in the world. All of them had tremendous physical gifts, but what separated the elite golfers from all the rest (like myself), was an uncanny ability to trust their instincts. When faced with a daunting shot to execute, I noticed they would almost always go with their first club choice. Hardly ever did I see the best players change their mind over a shot and switch clubs. When they did, they usually hit a poor shot.

      There’s a principle from the 14th century called Ockham’s razor which has been expanded upon over the centuries by philosophers, scientists, economists and mathematicians. The principal states that the explanation requiring the fewest assumptions is most likely to be correct. In other words, your first inclination or the simplest answer is usually correct.

      In today’s world with so much information at our fingertips, we all too often over complicate simple decisions and second guess our instincts because we make the mistake of using Google. The best golfers trust their instincts and don’t overthink. We should trust our guts more often; they have our best interest at heart.

      -Haymes Snedeker
      CFO/Cofounder, Fulcrum Construction Group + Hix Snedeker Companies

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